Saturday, 28 October 2017

GAY SEX BLAMED AS ANAL CANCER CASES SHOOT UP IN ZIM

INSTANCES of anal cancer are on the rise in Zimbabwe and one of the contributory factors for the increase is gay sex, a new study has shown.

The study done by Batsirai Mbodza, Tsitsi Juru, Notion Gombe, Gerlad Shambira, Mafuta Tshimanga was presented last Saturday during the 25th Edition of the University of Zimbabwe Annual Medical Research Day.

The findings showed an increase in the incidence of Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) related cancers in Harare urban population from 2005 to 2014, which is believed to be a representation of the situation in the country.

On a positive note, cervical cancer cases were said to have declined owing to the introduction of more cost effective screening programmes since 2010.

“The increases in the incidence of anal and head and neck cancers among men are disturbing, because there are no screening programmes for early detection of either of these cancers,” reads the study.

“We recommend scaling up of HPV vaccination and further researches on the role of HPV in anal, penile, head and neck malignancies among the male population in particular.”
Dr Simbarashe Chinyowa, the Senior Registrar at the University of Zimbabwe Department of Surgery, urged members of the public to seek medical attention whenever they experience pain, bleeding or any unusual discharge from the anus.
“There are many risk factors and these include HIV, HPV and it’s a sexually transmitted infection. So a lot of other risk factors are linked to sexual transmitted infections, multiple sexual partners, other STIs, homosexuality, smoking and alcohol. From the study I cannot make conclusions but we do think that the increase that we see is linked to HIV and HPV infections,” said Dr Chinyowa.

HPV infection, according to the research, is a major worldwide public health concern and continues to be the most common sexually transmitted illness with a link to cervical cancer.

“There is growing evidence of the infection being a relevant factor in other anogenital cancers of anus, vulva, vagina, penis as well as head and neck. An estimated 5.2 percent of all cancers that occur worldwide are attributable to HPV infection,” read the study.

It said the notable decline in cervical cancer trends over the years might be attributable to the decreasing HIV prevalence and the introduction of more cost effective screening programmes since 2010 in the country.

Mr Christopher Samkange, the Director of the University Of Zimbabwe Institute Of Continuing Health Education, said the increase may also be a sign that the country now has the ability to detect the disease.

“This was a unique research and it shows that the ability to detect such is there. We hope that those who practice medicine will be able to make use of this study and others which were published to improve our health service delivery,” said Mr Samkange. Herald

0 comments:

Post a Comment