Wednesday, 16 October 2019

WE ARE IMPLEMENTING MOTLANTHE RECOMMENDATIONS, SAYS GOVT


Government is in the process of implementing recommendations made by the Motlanthe Commission after the August 1, 2018 violence that left six people dead and will prosecute those responsible when investigations are completed.

The Motlanthe Commission was set up by President Mnangagwa following the violent protests that flared up after the harmonised elections last year which resulted in the death of six people and left at least 35 others injured.

Foreign Affairs and International Trade Minister Sibusiso Moyo yesterday said Government had already begun modernising 30 laws to enhance media freedoms and other democratic rights. 

“Zimbabwe has rapidly begun the task of implementing the Commission’s key recommendations — that include reforming legislation on law and order, freedom and liberalisation of the media and electoral reform,” Minister Moyo said.

The Public Order and Security Act has since been replaced by the Maintenance of Peace and Order Act while the Access to Information and Protection of Privacy Act is in the process of being repealed.

Government is also implementing a raft of other economic reforms espoused in the Transitional Stabilisation Programme (TSP) in line with the goal of making Zimbabwe a middle income economy by 2030.

The Motlanthe Commission found that the violent protests were pre-planned and organised by the opposition MDC-Alliance. 

It recommended the retraining of police to be professional and non-partisan, and to take action against the members of the security forces responsible for the killing of civilians during the protests.

Minister Moyo said action would be taken against those members responsible early next year.

“We can expect prosecutions of those responsible to begin next year, after the police and prosecution services have completed their post-inquiry investigations,” he said.

He added that the Government had embarked on the reform process that is painful in some instances, but was necessary.

“Currently, we are undertaking all these reforms, all the painful processes that are needed and necessary without any form of external assistance,” Minister Moyo said.

The minister said international support would strengthen the pace of reform in Zimbabwe and the Government’s drive for reconciliation and justice. 

The progress made by Zimbabwe was recently acknowledged by Commonwealth Secretary-General Patricia Scotland, who met President Mnangagwa during the UN General Assembly last month.

“I think there are a number of areas where Zimbabwe has made real reforms. No one is perfect and it is a journey,” Baroness Scotland said in September.

Zimbabwe is seeking re-admission into the Commonwealth which is in line with the overall re-engagement policy that Government has embarked on. Herald

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