Thursday, 4 October 2018

ALL BUT ONE KARIBA BOREHOLES CONDEMNED

CHILDREN in the Negande area of Nyaminyami, Kariba, are suffering from widespread teeth discolouration and decay owing to high mineral content in the water they drink.

This has resulted in at least 21 of 22 boreholes in the area being condemned after tests showed that the high mineral content was detrimental to the health of villagers.

Briefing Vice President Constantino Chiwenga during his tour of the area last week, Mashonaland West Minister of State, Mary Mliswa, said drilling of boreholes in the area was no longer an option.
“There were a lot of boreholes that were drilled in the area and out of 22 only 21 were certified safe for human consumption,” she said.


“It is rather sad that children in the Negande area here in Nyaminyami have rotten teeth owing to the water they are drinking. We need piped system to supply water to people in the area. Boreholes are no longer suitable.”

VP Chiwenga pledged to support the piloting of one of four boreholes with depths of up to 1 000 metres underground to see if the water is free of the harmful chemicals.

He said if the water remains unsafe for human consumption, then effort should be made to harness water from Lake Kariba which requires less chemicals to clean it.

“If we go deeper in drilling the boreholes in consultation with the Ministry of Mines and Mining Development, we can draw water from Lake Kariba and bring it closer to the people for the safety of our people,” he said.

The District Development Fund recently received drilling rigs that can go to depths of about 1 000 metres.

Health and Child Care Minister, Dr Obadiah Moyo, said investigations should be made on the depth at which salts and chemicals are found.

“It’s because of the salts, chemicals and minerals especially nitrites which have potential to harm the whole body. We need to see how deep they are and whether we can go beyond in drilling the boreholes for consumption by our people,” he said.

Children who drink the water would have lost their teeth by the time they reach 16 years, something that has become a distinguishing factor for children in the area.

Most of the children have brown stains on their teeth with some health experts saying it could be as a result to exposure to high levels of fluoride leading to a condition called dental fluorosis or mottling tooth enamel. Herald

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