Friday, 1 July 2016


PROPHETIC Healing and Deliverance (PHD) Ministries leader Walter Magaya has warned that Southern Africa will be hit by a wave of political violence anytime soon, and urged politicians not to resort to brutality to crush the uprisings.
In an interview with South African broadcaster Africa News Network7 (ANN7) on Wednesday night, Magaya claimed he had made the prophecies two weeks ago and urged the region’s political leaders, Zimbabwe included, not to take his predictions lightly.

“If you listen to our prophets, our lives will change. I strongly believe that as prophets and men of God in the countries and in this world, we are not being given a chance to be listened to,” he said.

“I gave a prophecy two weeks ago about things happening in South Africa right now. I said more violence would happen in Southern Africa than at any other time. The leaders must use their church leaders to calm down the violence.”

Magaya’s warnings come as Zimbabweans have become increasingly restive and taken to the streets and other platforms to demand good governance, an end to corruption and improvement in the economy.

South Africa holds crucial local government elections next month, while a Renamo insurgency is brewing in Mozambique, with some of that country’s citizens reportedly seeking refuge in Zimbabwe.

“So there is going to be more violence everywhere,” Magaya said ominously.
“There is going to be more violence, everywhere in Sadc. The devil is angry, saying Sadc has been at peace for so long. So there will be violence. What I will advise the leaders, who are listening, is to engage the nearest church to speak about peace.

“If you are correcting any politics, let’s do it in peace so that we maintain the little we have.”
Asked to clarify if the prophecy was directed at Zimbabwe, Magaya curtly responded: “I said Sadc.”

Earlier, Magaya had said if leaders listened and implemented his suggestions, Zimbabwe would be back on its feet within six months and have a prosperous future.
“The future of Zimbabwe is bright. Sometimes, when you go through hard times, it teaches you a lesson.

“Everyone has passed through what we are going through and may be even worse than us. But their future is now bright,” he said, giving an example of Japan, the world’s third biggest economy, which had two of its cities obliterated by atomic bombs at the end of the Second World War in 1945.

“It’s about your approach after the crisis that changes your nation. So to me, the future is bright if proper policies are implemented and what we are discussing with them is implemented. It’s just a tough moment, but it doesn’t mean it is the end.”

Magaya also spoke about his meeting with Reserve Bank of Zimbabwe governor John Mangudya over the introduction of bond notes.

He said he felt the announcement was prematurely made and that bond notes should be treated as a monetary issue and not a political one. Newsday


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